Journal of Information & Privacy Law

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Wearable Payment Methods and Identity Theft

By Richard “Joe” Cook, Managing Editor on Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

With the advent of Apple’s new Apple Watch and its ability to pay for products wirelessly, privacy concerns are already being raised. See Brian X. Chen & Steven Lohr.  The watch makes payments even faster and easier than before. While proponents of these devices tout the security of these devices, criminals will assuredly find ways…

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Location-Based Heartbreak: The Privacy of Dating Application Users is at Risk

By Carlos E. Carabajal, Production Editor on Friday, September 12th, 2014

To date, or not to date, that is the question—at least in 2014. Cell phones have essentially taken over the social life of most Americans and virtually anything can be done on them. One of those things is online dating. There are various dating applications that the general public can download to their cell phone…

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What We Can Learn About Cloud Storage From The Recent iCloud Leak

By Adam Florek, Editor-in-Chief on Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014

Over Labor Day weekend explicit photographs of a number of female celebrities were published online by an unknown Hacker.  Originally, the images were posted on 4Chan by the anonymous individual and later re-posted to Reddit. Of course the publication of such sensitive photos raises a number of issues: what recourse does Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton,…

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Europe v. Facebook: Class action brought against Facebook over violating user’s privacy rights and the future of the EU-US Safe Harbor Program

By Ann Daniels, Lead Production Editor on Monday, August 4th, 2014

On August 1, 2014, Austrian law student, Max Schrems, filed an extensive civil lawsuit in the Commercial Court for Vienna against Facebook claiming 500 Euros ($670) in damages per user for allegedly violating European user data privacy laws. Schrems and his group “Europe v. Facebook” are asking Facebook users to join this Austrian class action…

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SCOTUS is Unanimous – Police Must Have a Search Warrant to Search Data on a Cell Phone

By Meredith Mays Espino, Solicitation Editor on Thursday, June 26th, 2014

In a rare unanimous decision on June 25, 2014, the Court, in Riley v. California, determined that a police officer generally may not, without a warrant, search digital information on a cellphone seized from an individual under arrest.  Chief Justice Roberts, delivering the opinion, wrote that “modern cell phones . . . are now such…

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Face Recognition Technology Threatens Privacy

By Richard "Joe" Cook, Managing Editor on Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

The New York Times recently revealed that the NSA was collecting images of foreign targets from around the globe. With the increasing ease of data transmission and the increasingly public lives of individuals through social media and other means, the NSA has a vast resource for investigating various terrorist threats. It simply collects a few…

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The End of the Open Internet with Paid Prioritization

By Adam Florek, Editor-in-Chief on Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

It is undeniable that the Internet has given rise to an unprecedented access of information.  Over the past decade, Internet transmission speeds have skyrocketed and individual users have been given greater latitude in cyberspace. While these technological leaps have resulted in faster streaming services, such as Netflix and Hulu, better online gaming experiences, and more…

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Wait, Private Conversations Aren’t Always Private?! A Look at the Donald Sterling Scandal

By Adam Florek, 2014-2015 Editor-in-Chief on Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

For the past few weeks, it has been impossible to escape the scandal surrounding the Los Angeles Clippers and the team’s owner, Donald Sterling.  After Sterling’s racially charged remarks came to light, the NBA responded by levying a lifetime ban, $2.5 million fine, and threatened to force a sale of the team.  While these comments…

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Privacy: A Right or a Choice?

By Kalli Kling, Managing Editor on Friday, May 2nd, 2014

As the Supreme Court determines whether phones will be insulated from warrantless searches, privacy has come to the forefront of debates across the nation. Just yesterday, the White House released a report on “Big Data: A Technological Perspective” to discuss the ramifications that big data may have on privacy in the future due to the…

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Cell Phones and the Fourth Amendment – Is a Search Warrant Needed if the Arrest is Valid?

By Jocelyn Watkins, Production Editor on Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

Searching the data in a cell phone, without a warrant, as a search incident to arrest, does not violate the Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution. The Fourth Amendment guarantees: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures; shall not be violated…

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