Journal of Information & Privacy Law

Blog

Whisper Woes

By Jennifer Hunter, Production Editor on Sunday, October 26th, 2014

Recently, the Guardian published an expose about the popular secret-sharing app, Whisper.  Whisper, launched in 2012, allows users post and view their most intimate secrets with complete anonymity . . . or, at least that’s what they claim.  If what the Guardian published is true, Whisper users are in for a surprise because their “whispers”…

Continue Reading...

California Strengthens Privacy Laws with Additional Data Breach Provisions and SOPIPA

By Meredith Mays Espino, Solicitation Editor on Friday, October 10th, 2014

On September 30, 2014, Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law CA AB 1710, which expands data breach provisions already in place in California.  The new law provides for credit monitoring standards for those entities who offer it to their data breach victims, expands protections to include businesses that maintain personal information about California residents, and…

Continue Reading...

Wearable Payment Methods and Identity Theft

By Richard “Joe” Cook, Managing Editor on Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

With the advent of Apple’s new Apple Watch and its ability to pay for products wirelessly, privacy concerns are already being raised. See Brian X. Chen & Steven Lohr.  The watch makes payments even faster and easier than before. While proponents of these devices tout the security of these devices, criminals will assuredly find ways…

Continue Reading...

Bitcoin and Illegal Activity: Silk Road Defendants Pled Guilty on September 4, 2014

By Ann Daniels, Lead Production Editor on Saturday, September 13th, 2014

On September 4, 2014 in the Southern District of New York, Charlie Shrem, the CEO of “Bitinstant.com,” a Bitcoin exchange company, and Robert Faiella, “Silk Road Dealer” pled guilty to operating an unlicensed money transmitting business. This federal charge carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison. Silk Road was an online black-market website…

Continue Reading...

Location-Based Heartbreak: The Privacy of Dating Application Users is at Risk

By Carlos E. Carabajal, Production Editor on Friday, September 12th, 2014

To date, or not to date, that is the question—at least in 2014. Cell phones have essentially taken over the social life of most Americans and virtually anything can be done on them. One of those things is online dating. There are various dating applications that the general public can download to their cell phone…

Continue Reading...

What We Can Learn About Cloud Storage From The Recent iCloud Leak

By Adam Florek, Editor-in-Chief on Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014

Over Labor Day weekend explicit photographs of a number of female celebrities were published online by an unknown Hacker.  Originally, the images were posted on 4Chan by the anonymous individual and later re-posted to Reddit. Of course the publication of such sensitive photos raises a number of issues: what recourse does Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton,…

Continue Reading...

Europe v. Facebook: Class action brought against Facebook over violating user’s privacy rights and the future of the EU-US Safe Harbor Program

By Ann Daniels, Lead Production Editor on Monday, August 4th, 2014

On August 1, 2014, Austrian law student, Max Schrems, filed an extensive civil lawsuit in the Commercial Court for Vienna against Facebook claiming 500 Euros ($670) in damages per user for allegedly violating European user data privacy laws. Schrems and his group “Europe v. Facebook” are asking Facebook users to join this Austrian class action…

Continue Reading...

SCOTUS is Unanimous – Police Must Have a Search Warrant to Search Data on a Cell Phone

By Meredith Mays Espino, Solicitation Editor on Thursday, June 26th, 2014

In a rare unanimous decision on June 25, 2014, the Court, in Riley v. California, determined that a police officer generally may not, without a warrant, search digital information on a cellphone seized from an individual under arrest.  Chief Justice Roberts, delivering the opinion, wrote that “modern cell phones . . . are now such…

Continue Reading...

Face Recognition Technology Threatens Privacy

By Richard "Joe" Cook, Managing Editor on Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

The New York Times recently revealed that the NSA was collecting images of foreign targets from around the globe. With the increasing ease of data transmission and the increasingly public lives of individuals through social media and other means, the NSA has a vast resource for investigating various terrorist threats. It simply collects a few…

Continue Reading...
1 2 3 4